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Donna Wilson’s abstract assemblage sculptures are a feast for the eyes

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What started in 2019 as a free time for the textile and product designer Donna Wilson flee London for his native Scotland, which became Abstract assembly. In 2020 the art project took shape as a range of limited edition wooden chairs and mirrors as Wilson experimented with composition, color combinations and organic shapes, and in 2021 it evolved further. . The latest additions introduce unique small, abstract wood table sculptures, some with elements of hand-blown glass. The sculptures are made using traditional carpentry methods, with some pieces specifically leaving empty spaces for glass blowing. Each sculpture is entirely handmade in Wilson’s workshop in East London, using Douglas fir, oak or reclaimed wood. It is then finished with a combination of water-based paint and gloss paint, and covered with a transparent natural lacquer. Ready and waiting for your table!

colorful abstract wood sculpture

Nightfall

Detail of colorful abstract wood sculpture

Nightfall

colorful abstract wood sculpture

Blood Moon I

colorful abstract wood sculpture

Harvest moon

Detail of colorful abstract wooden sculpture

Harvest moon

colorful abstract wood sculpture

Blood Moon II

Detail of colorful abstract wooden sculpture

Blood Moon II

colorful abstract wood sculpture

Rod

colorful abstract wood sculpture

Pink

colorful abstract sculptures in wood and glass

colorful abstract wood sculpture

Midnight blue

colorful abstract sculpture in wood and glass

Inspire

colorful abstract detail of wood and glass sculpture

Inspire

colorful abstract sculpture in wood and glass

Bud

Detail of colorful abstract wooden sculpture

Here is the sun

To learn more about Donna Wilson’s abstract assemblage sculptures, visit donnawilson.com. Sculptures are available for purchase from scp.co.uk.


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In memory of Frank Soos, former award-winning Alaska writer and professor of creative writing

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Frank Soos (Photo courtesy of 49 Writers via Frank Soos)

Former Alaska award-winning writer and University of Alaska Fairbanks professor Frank Soos died last Wednesday in a solo bicycle accident in Maine. He was 70 years old.

Listen to this story:

Soos was born in 1950 and raised in the mining town of Pocahontas, Virginia. His parents had a market and this education taught Soos and his brother the value of hard work and community. Soos has never lost his regional accent or his self-defeating courtesy. While his literary interests originated in high school, they caught fire at Davidson College.

“Davidson sort of looked like that dream,” Soos said in 2019. “There were all these guys sitting under the trees reading books and talking. I thought, wow, if it’s college, I can do it.

In Davidson, Soos would meet his longtime friend and sometimes collaborator, art historian and painter Kesler Woodward. After college Soos taught high school for a while and found out he liked it, but life as a writer beckoned him and he entered the Creative Writing Program at the University of L ‘Arkansas, where he earned an MFA. Soos said higher education was unexpectedly enlightening.

“It was a horrible program,” he said. “It was intentionally cruel, and I decided I would never participate in a program like this if I was a teacher.”

These lessons found expression when he joined the English department at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks in 1986. There he met poet Peggy Shumaker and together helped forge a creative writing program. which has attracted writers from across the country and trained a new generation of renowned Alaskan writers.

“We had graduate students coming to me and I was like, ‘Here’s where you can compress,’” Shumaker said. “And then they’d go to Frank and Frank would say, ‘Well, maybe this is a place you can do it longer. “And I’m sure we confused a lot of students at first, but believe it or not, it worked.

Shumaker said Soos was the most generous teacher she had ever met.

“You learn when you are a teacher that if you put demands on students, you will impose them on yourself,” Soos said in 2019. “So to turn the situation around it means you sit at your desk and read a lot. articles and commenting a lot to prepare for all of these conferences. This is teaching.

This commitment to hard work extended to her writing. Shumaker says that in addition to his elegantly crafted phrases and odd ear for dialogue, Soos continued to write no matter what.

“He worked for decades with very little recognition, and then suddenly he had two pounds at a time,” she said. “And he was typically modest. But what he always did, in good times and bad, he just kept plugging in.

This tenacity saw Soos win the Flannery Connor Prize in 1998 and become the Alaska Winning Writer in 2014. A posthumous collection of Soos stories is expected to be released in 2023.

While Soos has always claimed to be a loner, he has managed to form a series of creative collaborations – with Shumaker and the painter Woodward and more intimately with his wife and artist Margo Klass. He is also inextricably linked to the bike and ski clubs of Fairbanks. Longtime friend and fellow Nordic skier, Susan Sugai said that while Soos does not compete in races like the 50K Sonot Kkaazoot, he does volunteer bibs or timing races.

“He knew times are important to people,” she said. “It’s not necessarily the people who win, it’s the people who participate and try to improve. He liked it.

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How Home Depot made Jasmine Mans a better writer

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Photos by Taylor Baldwin.

It is Disorganized, in which our favorite writers get to the bottom of their own craft. From favorite drinks for writing to whether or not you need to carry a notebook, we find out all the ways they beat writer’s block and do it. This week, we speak with Jasmine Mans on the occasion of her collection of poetry “Black girl, call home” which was released earlier this year. The work tackles topics such as black hair care, family bereavement and the tangled relationships between mothers and daughters. Below take a look at Mans’ writing process.

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JULIANA UKIOMOGBE: Describe your ideal writing atmosphere. What gets you in the mood?

JASMINE MANS: An organized space, without distractions. White noise, ocean sounds or a John Coltrane playlist. These options allow me to navigate a sonic journey without being distracted by literal words. While writing, I hear no words other than those I conjure.

UKIOMOGBE: Do you eat or drink while you write? If so, what do you like to have?

MANS: I am a chronic and terribly insane coffee drinker. I can handle a filter coffee or an oat milk latte in every writing session, one or maybe even two. When I think of writing, I think of things that make me feel safe. The warmth of the coffee reminds me of home and, in return, comforts me. Really, I had no idea how important comfort was in my writing process until now.

UKIOMOGBE? Do you sometimes smoke while you are writing?

MANS: Smoking weed can have many different reactions during the creative process. Sometimes cannabis makes you nervous, anxious, and fuzzy. There are other times when cannabis relaxes this mind, allowing for peace. I will also say, even as the CEO of a company called Buy Weed From Women, that the best mind is a sober mind.. Art doesn’t depend on cannabis, but I wish everyone a healthy canna-art relationship.

UKIOMOGBE: Do you keep a notebook and / or diary?

MANS: I keep too much, that’s the problem. Now I have a Google document on my computer titled “Next” and I will try to write everything in this document, or transfer all my writing to this document. To be a “good” writer, routine and organization are essential. Having one place to refer to your work allows you to track your growth.

UKIOMOGBE: Do you prefer handwriting or typing?

MANS: I prefer to type because I can literally think faster. I type faster than I write. However, laptops offer no distractions, no open tabs, no pop-up windows, no apps. With a notebook, it’s just you and the page. The computer understands you, the page, and the global web lustfully waiting to distract you. It’s not sure !

UKIOMOGBE: What’s your favorite quote?

MANS: “You are your best asset. »Toni Morrison, Beloved.

UKIOMOGBE: Who do you always come back to when writing?

MANS: I will always turn to Toni Morrison and Amiri Baraka.

UKIOMOGBE: What’s your favorite book to reread?

MANS: I love re-reading Dr Suess Oh the places you’ll go! when I’m drunk, honestly.

UKIOMOGBE: Do you read while you are writing?

MANS: Yeah, I read stuff to educate myself and to find smart ways to spread my language on the page. This is what I’m most proud of, my constant reading of things, all random and necessary things.

UKIOMOGBE: Which writers inform your current work the most?

MANS: Quinta Brunson, Ocean Vuong, Toni Morrison, Clint Smith, James Baldwin, Alice Walker, Gwendolyn Brooks, Roxane Gay and many more.

UKIOMOGBE: How many drafts of a piece do you usually write?

MANS: Excellent question! I’ve had poems that went through 30-40 drafts. I’ve had poems that only needed two drafts before they were finished. Drafts all depend on the depth, length and emotion of the poem.

UKIOMOGBE: What would be the title of your memoirs?

MANS: Maybe she was a genius.

UKIOMOGBE: Who is your favorite screenwriter?

MANS: Shonda Rhimes. She said she treated her audience like they were smart, I respect that. We want to treat our audience like they’re stupid, like we writers don’t exist in the same realities they live in. I feel smarter and smarter watching the work of Shonda Rhimes. I would like to offer the same to my audience.

UKIOMOGBE: Do you see writing as a spiritual practice?

MANS: Sometimes it does. I think we should make whatever we love a spiritual and ritualistic practice. When something becomes ritual, it is honored, it is cemented into the routine of life. The things that are related to his mind are to be protected, honored and shared.

UKIOMOGBE: Which writers would you choose to dine with, alive or dead?

MANS: Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Eckhart Tolle and Tupac Shakur. I would love to talk to Tracy Chapman about “Fast Car”, I would love to talk to Toni Morrison about Sula.

UKIOMOGBE: What advice do you have for those who want to become better writers?

MANS: Don’t stop. You are what you do. Keep writing and sharing, and discover new ways to fall in love with the craft. In 2017, I spent a year painting my poetry on a 6 foot Home Depot canvas. I am not a painter, but I rediscovered my love for poetry through painting and playing. Play with your art, don’t make your art your servant.

UKIOMOGBE: What are the unconventional techniques that you defend?

MANS: Physical exercise prepares the mind for writing. I am a better writer when I run. I believe other art forms can enhance yours. When I search for depth, I look at painters, storytellers, musicians and ballerinas in their techniques, I see how their techniques can be applied to my form.

UKIOMOGBE: Can good writing save the world?

MANS: That’s why God told a group of men to write the Bible.


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Oregon employee recovers benefits from energy drink explosion

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In a case with a rather odd pattern of facts, an Oregon appeals court upheld a state Workers’ Compensation Board ruling that awarded benefits to a painter who suffered an injury to his body. eye when the energy drink he was about to drink exploded, causing the cap bottle to hit him in the eye [SAIF Corp. v. Chavez-Cordova (In re Chavez-Cordova), 314 Ore. App. 5, 2021 Ore. App. LEXIS 1132 (Aug. 18, 2021)]. Quoting and citing generously from Larson’s Workers’ Compensation Act, the court recognized that the damage did not result from a personal risk to the painter despite the fact that he brought the drink to work. The court observed that the employer did not provide drinks to the employees, demanded that they take paid breaks and that the risk to which the painter incurred was sufficiently related to the employment to say that it arose from that employment.

Background

Claimant worked for the employer at a new construction painter. He was required to remain on the site during the compulsory paid breaks. With no place to sit during his break, claimant sat in the cab of his employer’s truck. He sustained an eye injury when, while opening a bottle of energy drink, its contents exploded and the cork shot him in the eye. The Workers’ Compensation Board determined that the claimant’s injury was not the result of his employment and the claimant appealed.

Risk categories

Quoting Larson’s Workers’ Compensation Act, current § 4.01, et seq.., the Oregon Court of Appeals noted that risks are broadly classified into three forms:

  • Risks associated with employment
  • Personal risks
  • Neutral risks

In this case, it was not disputed that the cause of the claimant’s injury was not an employment hazard. The Board also rejected the employer’s contention that the claimant was injured due to a personal risk. The Commission found that the risk of the bottle cap striking the claimant in the eye was a neutral risk that was neither job related nor personal to claimant.

Imported danger?

The court rejected the employer’s argument that the risk of injury was personal to the claimant because he had brought the energy drink to work. The court said drink bottles are ubiquitous in the workplace; he was skeptical of treating them as inherently dangerous objects or personal instruments of risk [quoting Larson, § 9.03[5]].

In addition, the court noted, “[a]s Larson explains that even injuries caused by “imported” hazards can be compensable if there is a causal link with the job ” [Larson, § 9.03[3]]. The court continued:

Even assuming, as the employer contends, that the Applicant’s energy drink was an imported hazard, the consumption of the drink by the Applicant was related to employment. Since the employer required the claimant to take his paid breaks on the job site and not provide drinks, bringing his own beverage was a feature of the claimant’s job. The Board found that the employer had agreed and considered that the Claimant would drink beverages during his paid break, and this finding is supported by substantial evidence. Claimant’s injury occurred while performing this controlled act.

Based on the foregoing, the court concluded that the Board did not err in determining that Claimant’s employment placed him in a position of injury and that the injury therefore resulted from the employment.


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In memory of Frank Soos, former award-winning Alaska writer and professor of creative writing

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Frank Soos (Photo courtesy of 49 writers.)

Former Alaska award-winning writer and professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Frank Soos, has passed away. Soos was on a solo bike ride in Maine last Wednesday when he suffered a fatal accident.

Frank Soos was born in 1950 and raised in the mining town of Pocahontas, Virginia. His parents had a market and this education taught Soos and his brother the value of hard work and community. Soos has never lost his regional accent or his self-defeating courtesy. While his literary interests originated in high school, they caught fire at Davidson College.

“Davidson sort of looked like that dream,” Soos said in 2019. “There were all these guys sitting under the trees reading books and talking. I thought, wow, if it’s college, I can do it.

At Davidson, Soos would meet his longtime friend and sometimes collaborator, art historian and painter Kesler Woodward. After college Soos taught high school for a while and found out he liked it, but life as a writer beckoned him and he entered the Creative Writing Program at the University of L ‘Arkansas, where he earned an MFA. Soos said higher education was unexpectedly enlightening.

“It was a horrible program,” he said. “It was intentionally cruel, and I decided I would never participate in a program like this if I was a teacher.”

These lessons found expression when he joined the English department at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks in 1986. There he met poet Peggy Shumaker and together helped forge a creative writing program. which has attracted writers from across the country and trained a new generation of renowned Alaskan authors.

“We had graduate students coming to me and I was like, ‘Here’s where you can compress,’” Shumaker said. “And then they would go to Frank and Frank would say, ‘Well, maybe this is a place you can do it longer. “And I’m sure we confused a lot of students at first, but believe it or not, it worked.

Shumaker said Soos was the most generous teacher she had ever met.

“You learn when you are a teacher that if you put demands on students, you will impose them on yourself,” Soos said in 2019. office and read a lot of articles and make a lot of comments to prepare for all these lectures . This is teaching.

This commitment to hard work extended to her writing. Shumaker says that in addition to his elegantly crafted phrases and odd ear for dialogue, Soos continued to write no matter what.

“He worked for decades with very little recognition and then all of a sudden he had two pounds at a time,” she said. “And he was typically modest. But what he always did, in good times as in bad times, he just kept plugging in.

This tenacity saw Soos win the Flannery Connor Prize in 1998 and become the Alaska Winning Writer in 2014. A posthumous collection of Soos stories is expected to be released in 2023.

While Soos has always claimed to be a loner, he has managed to form a series of creative collaborations – with Shumaker and the painter Woodward and more intimately with his wife and artist Margo Klass. He is also inextricably linked to the Fairbanks bike and ski clubs. Longtime friend and fellow Nordic skier, Susan Sugai said that while Soos does not compete in races like the 50K Sonot Kkaazoot, he does volunteer bibs or timing races.

“He knew times are important to people,” she said. “It’s not necessarily the people who win, it’s the people who participate and try to improve. He liked it.


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Gaia Servadio, writer, literary salonist and Boris Johnson’s first stepmother – obituary

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Gaia Servadio, who died in Rome at the age of 82, was a journalist and writer of irrepressible Italian descent, author of some 40 books, who spent most of her life in Britain and who animated for decades one of the last notable literary salons; she was also formerly Boris Johnson’s mother-in-law.

Encouraged by an Anglophile mother who had worked at the British Council in Rome, Gaia Servadio arrived in London in the mid-1950s, when she was 17. Originally, she hoped to be a painter, and enrolled in the Chelsea School of Art before studying design. at St Martin’s and Camberwell.

Luckily, the BBC asked him to participate in the making of a documentary on Danilo Dolci, the Sicilian social activist. It started her career as a journalist, first as a correspondent for Italian newspapers, although later she wrote for British newspapers, including the Telegraph headlines.

She has especially established herself by her work on the Mafia, little known beyond Sicily before the 1960s. Following the popular success of The Godfather, she published in 1974 a biography of the boss of the Mafia Angelo La Barbera, who is stabbed to death in prison the following year. She herself received threats and then focused on other matters.

In 1961, when she was still in her twenties, she married Willy Mostyn-Owen, who was then working for Christies. Ten years his senior, he was familiar with Italy, having previously been employed by art historian Bernard Berenson at I Tatti, his home in Florence.

An Old Etonian – a school she thought was overrated – and the owner of Aberuchill Castle, Perthshire, and Woodhouse, a Georgian mansion in Shropshire, Mostyn-Owen provided an entry into English society for Gaia.

Although she in turn brought a decided glamor to it, like many expats, she could be scathing about her new home. “The English – well, some of them are terrible fools,” she mused of the upper-class milieu she found herself in, “but some are eloquent and literate.”

She felt treated by her husband’s friends as an oddity (she never lost her hoarse accent), perhaps not least because she was then a full member of the Italian Communist Party. She later revealed that Mostyn-Owen had also been baffled by the overwhelming success in 1967 of her Candide-style novel Melinda, On the Spirit of the Times.

Although the couple had three children and their marriage did not officially end until much later, there has been infidelity on both sides. Her many admirers included Gianni Agnelli, who wooed her aboard his yacht. When, in a fit of anger at her young son’s mess, she threw all of her toys out the window, including a highly prized model of a Fiat 500 that Agnelli had given her, the tycoon replaced it with another – on a large scale.

Gaia Servadio believed that Agnelli was drawn to her because he was used to women who were “princesses or prostitutes”, not to those who had their own opinions; she was always aware that in Italy it was difficult to be taken seriously as a woman. She was cheerfully outspoken, her dislikes encompassing political correctness and psychoanalysis (“the penance of the middle classes”).

Her home on the Chelsea-Pimlico border, her chaotic cuisine reflecting a style of making that she admitted to be ‘rushed’ or sloppy, has become a meeting point for many other Italians passing through London.

Among the visitors were Primo Levi, a friend of his father, a fellow industrial chemist, Inge Feltrinelli, widow of the publisher of Dr Zhivago, and director Bernardo Bertolucci and his wife Clare Peploe.

There they could meet historians and writers such as Eric Hobsbawm, Denis Mack Smith, Al Alvarez and Lady Antonia Fraser. Gaia Servadio’s address book ranged from Harold Acton to Evelyn Waugh, including Maria Callas, Pierre Cardin, EM Forster, Mary McCarthy, Nancy Mitford and Philip Roth.

Her own books, mostly in Italian, included biographies of director Luchino Visconti (1980) and composer Gioachino Rossini (2015), an inspirational life for La Traviata, Giuseppina Strepponi (1994) and a study of Renaissance women. (1986).

Among a myriad of other projects in which she was involved include a Gustav Mahler music festival in London in 1985, organized with Claudio Abbado, the conductor, and a Verdi Week in 2011 for the Italian Embassy in the occasion of the 150th anniversary of the Unification.

Several times in the 1980s, Gaia Servadio hosted Channel 4’s talk show After Dark. She also researched the archeology of Sicily (for which she learned to read Phoenician), and in 2008, Asma Assad, the wife of the Syrian ruler, asked him to organize an arts festival in Damascus, although the events were unsuccessful.

Travel was another passion, not only in the Middle East, but also in India, France and Russia. She was proud to speak a little Russian, and in a characteristic episode, on a recent trip to Estonia, she haggled with a street vendor for the price of a box of caviar. When it was opened it turned out to contain dog food.


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The delicate, sexual and clinical visions of a painter from birth

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LOS ANGELES – The act of bringing a child into the world elicits strong reactions: disbelief, fear, joy, disgust. In a world full of differences – personal, social and political – birth is one of the few truly universal experiences, and despite the awe-inspiring depth of the event, we take it for granted, perhaps because it takes place. produced all the time. As you read this sentence, someone, somewhere, is bringing a new human being into the world, and it is this act that Bridget Mullen’s solo show in Shulamit Nazarian, aptly titled Birthday, is based on.

There is a tenderness and an intimacy in the paintings, all made in 2021, which are not just an emotional projection on their subject. They are quite small, like illustrated portraits, each measuring 12 inches by nine inches, and are painted more delicately than most of Mullen’s other works, which tend to be populated with harsher lines and rougher shapes. When viewed together, the paintings are obviously anatomical: yonic amalgams of thigh and butt-like shapes merge around smaller circles of vaginas and anuses, seen both sexually and clinically. .

Installation view of Bridget Mullen: birthday at Shulamit Nazarian

Once taken apart, however, many paintings could just as easily be interpreted as a variety of other abstractions. The overlapping lines of “Birthday Series # 22” could be an art deco building; the cartoonish shapes of “Birthday Series # 13” could be a face. This lack of literalness in no way weakens the paintings, on the contrary opening them to a variety of other interpretations, not the least of which is the relationship between the act of birth and the act of making art. Says Mullen in an interview with Maake Magazine, “I work in free association, without project, to create paintings and sculptures. In a sense, the style that Mullen paints is similar to the uncertainty of giving birth to a child: you may have created it, but it does come to life in the end. Part of the artistic and parenting process is coming to terms with the fact that, at the end of the day, you have very little control over the direction this life takes.

Bridget Mullen, “Birthday Series # 21” (2021), Flashe and spray paint on linen, 12 x 9 inches

Bridget Mullen: birthday continue to Shulamit Nazarian (616 North La Brea Avenue, Hancock Park, Los Angeles) until August 28.

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3 tips for writing female friendships in fiction

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“I would be lost without you.” These words from Nancy Mitford The pursuit of love talk about the primacy of friendships between womena theme poignantly evoked in the wonderful new television adaptation of the novel. The story follows two young women from their little girl days to melodramatic teenage girls and, finally, femininity. By losing themselves, they lose themselves.

In the story of the novel, it’s a radical feeling. Novels focusing on female friendships are a relatively recent invention. A mirror of society and culture, the English novel, which became the precursor of the American novel, favors the marriage plot. Dating back to at least the 18th century, courtship and marriage provided both the subject and the narrative arc of fiction.

Fortunately, we are past the days when friendships between women were relegated to the background. From now on classics like Nancy Mitford’s The pursuit of love and Mary McCarthy The group contemporary books such as Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan trilogy and Emma Cline’s Girls, the authors credibly and richly integrated female friendships into the lives of their characters.

I wrote two novels about real women in history, first the poet Forugh Farrokhzad in Song of a captive bird, a novel released in 2018, and more recently with the iconic photographer Dorothea Lange in The Bohemians, released last April. Each book taught me how looking at female friendships can enrich my storylines and create a truer and more engaging portrayal of the lives of my characters. Here are three.

(5 tips to breathe life into “real life” fictional characters)

Put friendships first

One way to approach friendship in fiction is to treat it as worthy of its own story. We like to imagine our heroines as self-sufficient and independent, but studying the lives of women in history, as well as the women in our own lives, shows how they often only became powerful through their relationships with other women. Rather than portraying your heroine as a lonely renegade, think about how her friendships have helped shape her.

Just as Dorothea Lange’s actual story hasn’t been cohesive until she finds friends without considering her friendships, my story about her may not have been cohesive. When I was doing research The Bohemians, I discovered that she had worked with a Chinese-American assistant in her first portrait studio in the 1920s in San Francisco. Although the relationship has been overlooked in biographical accounts of Lange’s life, it seemed to me that this collaboration must have left its mark on her, so I set out to imagine her through a fictional tale.

In The BohemiansDorrie’s empathy for the strangers and the dispossessed (a signature of Lange’s work) grows through her friendship with Caroline Lee. Thanks to Caroline, she gets to know parts of San Francisco that might otherwise have gone unnoticed. When writing fiction, think about how friendship opens up different worlds for your character. As in life, a fictional friend may present your character with a drastically different life experience or outlook on life, which may cause them to change course.

Complicate friendships to make the best stories

Tension is the cornerstone of good storytelling. Culture and literature have described the relationships between women as predominantly and inevitably competitive. Jealousy certainly makes its appearance even in the tightest unions between women, but friendship is just as likely the source of support and companionship.

While it is important to go beyond the myth of rival women, be careful not to rule out all conflicts between the female characters. In The Bohemians, Dorrie and Caroline are two young women immersed in the drama of discovering each other. They make mistakes and they call themselves on those mistakes. Their disagreements are part of the story of their evolution towards femininity.

While you can certainly follow a character’s development in other ways, putting them in conversation with a friend gives the reader intimate access to their state of mind. Uncomfortable truths, buried secrets, long-standing rivalries: friendships embody complexities and invite dialogue. It is in the conversation with our friends that we give meaning to our life; aspects of our stories that seem fragmented or inexplicable are made whole by the stories we tell ourselves.

Playing friendship against other relationships

Another way to delve deeper into the role of friendship is to consider how it plays out against other relationships in your characters’ lives. Friendships between women can begin in childhood and end in adolescence, or later in life. Other life experiences can darken them or even extinguish them altogether. When Dorrie falls in love with the painter Maynard Dixon in The Bohemians, his friendship with Caroline inevitably changes, creating a different closeness between the two women.

A number of things will change and eventually turn a friendship between women for good. How do friendships survive such changes? What remains of a friendship we left when we went to college or had kids or moved across the country? Paying attention to how friendships change over the years – and why those changes are happening – can tell us a lot about how characters deal with fear and challenges.

Friendships connect the past and the present; they speak forcefully of how we are becoming what we are becoming. In a world where the idea of ​​friendship can seem toned down and imperiled, writing about female friendships can remind us how much our lives depend on genuine connections with our friends. They are our witnesses, our confidants, our champions and, yes, sometimes also our enemies. In fiction, friendship provides a space where our characters can be themselves unvarnished, showing us what might otherwise be lost for us and also for them.

Advanced novel writing

Push yourself beyond your comfort zone and take your writing to new heights with this novel writing workshop, specially designed for novelists looking for in-depth commentary on their work. When you take this online workshop, you will not have weekly reading assignments or lectures. Instead, you’ll just focus on making your novel.

Click to continue.


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A reader wanted to return a work of art to the painter’s family, and she found it

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This photo of a painting was featured here last January. The painting was done by Adeline Speletich, Fargo, years ago and had come into possession of Joy Streed, Fargo, who wished to return it to a member of Adeline’s family.

Joy tells “Neighbors” that she is happy to announce that she then found out about Adeline’s great-granddaughter in Wisconsin and sent her the painting.

Meanwhile, information about Adeline arrived.

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“Mrs. Spelletich was my next door neighbor for 11 years in the 60s and 70s”, Joan moen, Fargo, writes. “She was a lovely woman with a great sense of humor.

“She was a writer, sculptor and artist. I could go on and on to describe his attributes.

“When my three sons were young children, I asked him if I could buy a painting. She responded by giving me one.

“She was a down to earth woman who loved life while putting up with a divorcee with three little boys living next door.

“We were devastated when she died in a car accident in 1975.”

David Anderson, Fargo, writes that Adeline was her grandfather’s sister HC Aamoth.

“I have a painting of her hanging in my office, Dakota Monument Co.,” he says.

“I believe her husband Adam owned Adam’s Equipment. They are both buried at Riverside Cemetery in South Fargo.

“If I remember correctly, Adeline died in a car crash on Downer’s Road at the right-hand intersection in Downer, Minn. She and three girls were on their way to the lakes.”

Marjorie schlossman, Fargo, also writes, noting that Adeline was her grandmother’s close friend.

“My grandmother, Alice (Jordan) Black, was married to George Black the unnamed Fargo store and the black building, ”writes Marjorie.

This painting was done by Adeline Spelletich, and a message on the back says it was given to a friend of hers, Mrs. Black.  Special at the Forum

This painting was done by Adeline Spelletich, and a message on the back says it was given to a friend of hers, Mrs. Black. Special at the Forum

RELATED COLUMNS:

“I’m writing to you about the column you had on the record stores in Fargo; Daveau, as an example ”, writes Carol zieman, Oakes, North Dakota

“When I was working in Fargo at the time, I was buying music and records from Daveau,” she says.

“But my roommate and I had our favorite store… Bernie’s, just off Roberts Street.

“I was teaching in a rural school. One day, while writing to my friend in Fargo, I heard the song ‘Heartbreak Hotel’ on the radio. I pointed out in my letter about this new singer, and that I liked his voice.

“About a week later, I went to Fargo to stay with my friend and her mother. My friend had heard the song too, so we went to Bernie’s and bought our first Elvis Presley record. I still have it.

“When I went to work at Fargo, we often dated Bernie’s; more Elvis recordings (ha ha) and lots of music from the 50s (usually 45).

“Your article on Daveau, etc., brought up funny memories of Fargo and Bernie.

“I could say,” Carol continues, “when two young girls are probably working at their first job, one doesn’t earn a huge salary, but we always found enough $$$ to buy these records.

“I might add that my favorite Elvis CD is ‘One Alone’, a group of gospel songs. “


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100 Sculptures – NYC – The Brooklyn Rail

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new York

anonymous gallery
June 30 – August 21, 2021

Stroll around the two floating shelves suspended from the ceiling to 100 sculptures at the anonymous gallery you have something of the sense of wonder that must have invigorated Darwin, fresh off from HMS Beagle, wandering and investigating the sometimes familiar, but often alien, species of the Galapagos. Todd von Ammon and the gallery have organized together a menagerie of forms: these objects can illustrate the history of sculpture, they certainly represent its different categories and typologies, and all are very small. They moved from the figurative to the abstract, from the absurd and surreal to the conceptual and symbolic.

Faces and body parts in particular are immediately imprinted on our perception. B. Thom Stevenson’s My eyes are up there (2018) is the simplest rendering of a face: two circles punched into a larger circle of steel emerging from a shallow plateau, while Kristin Reger’s Swerving (2018) confronts us with a tongue of gray and pink glossy sandstone, and that of Nevine Mahmoud Tutti glass (2018) takes the form of an elongated glass chest. Still in ceramic, Hugo Montoya created a hybrid of a phallus and a woman’s torso in Venus penis (2018), an erotic container carrying a handle. The motivation for turning these small items into practical tools also seems logical: Small things tend to inhabit our space more intimately, and sitting on our shelves and desks, they can often serve a dual purpose. Some of the 100 sculptures shown here, however, emerge from the opposite end of this thought process, imitating little things we use and turning them into static shapes we can’t. Tony Matelli’s¢ 27 (2021) is a glass with a gel of 27 cents embedded in polyurethane. With Daniel (2017), Andrew Ross takes a plastic cast of a cherry bomb, 8th hour (perpetual night) n ° 1 (2020) manifests a fondant bronze candle by Nicole Nadeau, and Dixie Cup (rejected) (2018) finds a Dixie Cup electrolytically crushed by Shelter Serra. All these objects are rendered useless by their material metamorphosis.

Still channeling Darwin, we can also examine the company these small objects keep: each of the two “cabinets of curiosity” in 100 sculptures has three wide shelves providing an expanse of ground in which to create environments and relationships between works. At Urs Fischer Untitled (2013), a painted earth dove of peace surmounted by a fleshy egg, is close to that of Remy Cherry Remy (1) (2018), a rose quartz egg with oil painted ornaments, which stands next to Daniel Giordano My Clementine LXLV (so good) (2020), a spotted and humble Raku ceramic globe that embodies two readings of the fertility symbol sphere: the egg and the fruit. Ray Johnson’s simple, undated and untitled wood block with a bunny in black and white, seems to share little with Ryan Foerster’s Modeling for dinner (2018) behind him on the bottom shelf. Even when two objects seem to share little, the very tension of their dissimilarity turns out to be productive, making us aware of the codes and taxonomies we use to give meaning to works of art. The first participates in this status because of the fact that it is inscribed with a mystical image of leporidae, and the second because it is an intriguing colorful abstract object perched on top of a support, legitimizing it by as art. They may not be the same gender or family, but they definitely inhabit the same kingdom.

So, with a set of samples like this on hand, is it just for some casual fun looking at 100 small pieces of sculpture? Of course not, there is also a lot to learn here. At this kind of scale, the intention is not to crush, but to be direct. Very few works appear to be leftovers or rubbish. Like Darwin’s research on animal species, the alien qualities of the unknown are often dazzling, but we only begin to understand them by comparison with what we already know. What struck me about this sculpture exhibition in the age of NFT and digital insubstantiality is the presence of things that artists have known and used for thousands of years. Elizabeth Kley’s Small Colorful Earthenware Beaker Cylinder with green leaves (2015); Sage Schachter Lucky mug (2020), a cute, warped little drinking vessel apparently mired in its own spilled milk; Love / Hate vase (working title) (2021) by Roxanne Jackson, a tattooed amphora enhanced with very kissable red lips; and that of Emily Mullin Flex all day (2018), bringing everything back to the start with a simple vase bud and an even simpler geometric icing, all these works bring us back to the fundamentals, and thus give us a precious light on the task of artistic innovation. If the sculpture did, in fact, begin with a vase, or a cup, or a bowl, the implication is that the medium was always a frame to contain or display what was already there.


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