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Oliver Hirschbiegel’s “The Painter” Trailer Debuts

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Berlin-based sales agency Picture Tree International has released the trailer for the docu-fiction “The Painter,” a collaboration between German director Oliver Hirschbiegel, best known for Oscar-nominated “Downfall,” and German artist Albert Oehlen.

The work stars Ben Becker, whose credits include “Brother of Sleep” and “Comedian Harmonists”, and features the voice of Charlotte Rampling. The film concludes post-production with PTI presenting the trailer at the Toronto Film Festival’s Hybrid Market.

The film depicts Oehlen grappling with a painting and pondering the meaning of his creation. Becker imitates the painter and recreates a painting that Oehlen himself creates step by step behind the camera, the actor improvising the process in front of the camera.

According to a statement, the film “follows the artist as he struggles and suffers through this process, with us watching in joyful desperation, wondering what might happen next, until the blank canvas turns into a finished painting ”.

The statement added: “” The Painter “is a constant flow of the artist’s journey with elements of farce and comedy topped with emotional moments of truth. […] leaving it up to us to decide what is real and / or genuine.

Mike Downey, executive producer of the film and president of the European Film Academy, added: “It’s also a conundrum about authorship, the art world, the audience and the market. He plays with a number of ideas that are not only deep about how the average man defines what art is – he also questions how far the role of artists is. author and to what extent the participants play this role.

Hirschbiegel and Oehlen are longtime friends and collaborators and both studied at the Hochschule der Bildenden Künste Hamburg, “The Painter” being their first artistic collaboration in a long time.

The music is brought to you by an icon of the German electronic music scene, singer-songwriter DJ Gudrun Gut. Gudrun was a founding member of the Malaria group and of the experimental project “Matador” with Pepita Duursma and Beate Bartel, as well as director of the Music Project Ocean Club, which regularly presented shows in the legendary Berlin club Tresor.

PTI’s fall lineup also includes Toronto Industry Selects’ track “Domingo”, which is in final negotiation for a North American deal, as well as the Zurich Film Festival gala premiere “Chasing the Line” and l adult entertainment “Welcome to Siegheilkirchen”.


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Buddhadeb Guha, the iconic writer who was a singer by training and a good painter too

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He qualified as a chartered accountant, but switched to writing although his first steps were cut short. He would remember his first steps in the Anandabazar Patrika office to meet famous author Ramapada Choudhury, who edited the Sunday supplement. Along with a story, he carried a letter of recommendation from another well-known author. Choudhury took the news and, in front of Guha, shredded the letter into pieces and threw them in the wastebasket. But he recognized from history that there was a writer here who would go far.

Le Pooja Special issue of Anandbazar Patrika, 1963 publishes his novel The man-eater of Sitagadh who may have founded the special genre that distinguished Guha from his peers and made him famous – novels and short stories about forest areas in different parts of West Bengal and other states, especially Jharkhand , such as McCluskieganj, Palamau, the Sundarbans and other jungles that have become a part of his life and have gone beyond his writing. “Nature is my first love for life. The backdrop of nature will remain the main ambience of all my writing, ”he once said.

Guha was very courteous in his lifestyle. He was one of the first to create characters depicting modern, easy-going Bengali families that readers could relate to, earning him instant popularity. His novels and short stories are characterized by their dreamy abstraction and romantic appeal. His essays reveal the soul of a true wanderer and offer some of the finest interpretations of trips to Bengal. His love for forests and nature are the backdrops of several of his novels.

This love for nature and for traveling through the state’s natural habitats led to another school of writing for him – writing for children and adults for which he created a completely separate series with the imaginary character Rijuda. and his sidekick Rudra which was an adventure-travel series that won him great popularity as a writer with a genre all his own. His first book in the Rijuda series was Rijudar Shonge Jongoley which totaled about 28 novels. About 6 children’s books revolved around a character named Rivu such as Parnomochi which explored a boy’s sexual arousal as a teenager.


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Cariboo scenes inspire artist – 100 Mile House Free Press

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Cameron Bird had to make the difficult choice of upscaling or painting it.

The Lac La Hache artist chose the latter, but his former career as a pack horse guide at Chilcotin Holidays Guest Ranch is a great source of inspiration for his works of art.

“Working up there is one of the biggest inspirations for what I do. I paint a lot of mountain and high mountain scenes, so on horseback you sit there slowly going through the environment, so I was able to study everything, ”says Bird.

“It gave me the confidence to paint. Just like a writer. They say ‘write down what you know’ and I have learned over the years to paint what I know.

While he prefers landscapes, Cameron Bird sometimes likes to paint large game such as moose. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

Bird, 49, grew up in the Lower Mainland, but had developed a love for the ancient history of Cariboo ranching and horses. After learning to shoe a horse, he decided to work with them. He took a guide course at Chilcotin before finding a job at Chilcotin Holidays Guest Ranch. It was there that he met his wife Amanda.

As a pack horse guide, Bird said he liked the physicality of the guiding and the wide range of jobs, which included hauling logs, taking people on pack trips, and observing. big game. The demanding remote work, however, made it difficult to paint and deliver his work to galleries. Eventually, he chose to hang up his saddle to pick up his brush full time.

“I realized that in order to really do it full time, I just had to take the leap. There wasn’t really a ‘right time’ so I did and have been painting full time since 2000, ”Bird says.

A British Columbia Vineyard by Cameron Bird.  (Photo by Patrick Davies - 100 Mile Free Press)

A British Columbia Vineyard by Cameron Bird. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

READ MORE: Gravel is the new gold: Cyclist challenges new cycling trend

Becoming a professional was something Bird dreamed of since he was a child, following in his father’s artistic footsteps. He started selling his detailed realistic watercolors in high school in 1989.

That started to change when he met his mentor, Kevin C. Smith, with whom he studied for a decade. Smith encouraged Bird to start using oil paints and develop his own unique style, which has evolved a lot over the past 30 years.

“These days I don’t even really think of a pretty picture, I think of powerful colors and interlocking shapes,” Bird says. “I think it’s a natural evolution just to paint everyday.”

Cameron Bird is leafing through one of his many sketchbooks.  Most of Bird's paintings start out as sketches and notes in these books before being turned into works of art.  (Photo by Patrick Davies - 100 Mile Free Press)

Cameron Bird is leafing through one of his many sketchbooks. Most of Bird’s paintings start out as sketches and notes in these books before being turned into works of art. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

To create a piece, Bird scours her sketchbooks for inspiration. He has several in his studio with detailed notes on the setting and location of the sketches. From there, he does a study on a wooden board where he captures the basic energy and colors of the final product.

Once the study was completed, using custom canvases made in Kelowna, Bird began painting his impressionistic depictions of the landscapes and landmarks of Cariboo. He switched to this almost abstract style to better represent the power of the images he sees in his mind.

An untitled painting of a mountain by Cameron Bird.  (Photo by Patrick Davies - 100 Mile Free Press)

An untitled painting of a mountain by Cameron Bird. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

“My style, one brushstroke can say more than 50 brushstrokes. I love the power in my paintings and a lot of people love stronger paints on their walls and more vivid colors, ”Bird says. “Today I have the chance to push him.”

READ MORE: Master sculptor Dempsey Bob plans artist residency for British Columbia’s North Pacific Cannery

Bird uses a single brush for each painting and uses sign painting skills learned at the British Columbia Institute of Technology. Learning to hold a brush gently and load it correctly has been the key to its success.

His large paintings can go up to $ 10,000 and are sold in galleries from Banff to Quebec. On the business side, he credits Amanda’s support and organizational skills to keeping what he does profitable.

A painting of an old hangar near the 108 Mile heritage site by Cameron Bird.  (Photo by Patrick Davies - 100 Mile Free Press)

A painting of an old hangar near the 108 Mile heritage site by Cameron Bird. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

Despite the fact that they could live anywhere, Bird said they chose to move to Lac La Hache to raise their family. He loves the “dry country” of the Cariboo and continues to draw inspiration from its landscapes. He typically produces 120 paintings a year and estimates that he made 5,000 in his lifetime. Although being a professional artist is risky, he says it’s a lifestyle he enjoys living.

” I do not get enough. When we go on vacation, if I want to relax, I usually have to go to places that I wouldn’t paint. Mexico, New Zealand or London, I can just relax, I was not inspired to paint. When I’m in Jasper, however, I’m like ‘oh this is a painting, this is a painting.’ I am inspired all the time.

A painting of a bear by Cameron Bird.  (Photo by Patrick Davies - 100 Mile Free Press)

A painting of a bear by Cameron Bird. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

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Writer-painter Dinesh Rai dies of prolonged illness in Bhopal

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BHOPAL: Dinesh Rai, author, painter and playwright died at his residence here Monday morning. He was 81 years old. Rai, who had been ill for many years, leaves behind his wife and two daughters.

A man of many talents, Rai had also written scripts for a few films, including “Wafa” and “Kalka”. He had also written the scripts for numerous television shows and radio plays. Rai, who was a lawyer by profession, was a close friend of poet and lyricist Javed Akhtar and film actor Rajeev Verma.

In fact, Rajeev Verma claimed that Rai was a negro for Javed Akhtar. Verma said that Rai was an excellent painter and writer. “He was like my older brother,” he said, adding that he and Shyam Munshi were like family.

Rai had written the drama adaptation of Munshi Premchand’s famous novel “Godan”, which was staged at Ravindra Bhawan about 40 years ago. “I performed in the play as well as in its production crew,” said Verma.

It was the first play to be performed outdoors in the city on a large scale, said Urdu playwright Rafi Shabbir.

Mumbai-based writer and director Rumi Jafferi said he first met Rai in 1986 in Mumbai. “At that time, he was moving to Bhopal and he gave me his rented accommodation, as well as the furniture and accessories,” he said.

An exhibition of his paintings was held at the Jehangir Art Gallery in Mumbai. “Javed Akhtar and I went to see the exhibit. We wanted to buy one of his paintings but instead he asked us to buy the works of young painters from MP. “Mine, I will give it to you,” he told us, ”Jafri said.

According to Jafferi, Rai’s disappearance is a great loss for Bhopal. “He was a very talented person. But he was not ambitious, ”he said. Jafferi said that when Javed Akhtar visited Rai’s residence in Bhopal, he was surprised to see that three rooms in the house were full of books.

Artist Hamidullah Khan ‘Mamu’ said Rai was like a loving and loving head of the family to him. Mamu said that Rai was very interested in the annual Iftekhar Natya Samaroh and offered valuable advice and guidance. “The city has lost three beautiful people in the recent past – Shyam Munshi, Manzoor Ahtesham and now Dinesh Rai,” Mamu said.

Actor and theater director Dinesh Nair has said that Rai is an idealist. “He left the legal profession because he didn’t want to stand up for people who had done something wrong,” Nair said. Rai was in love with his ancestral home and had it rebuilt. In the meantime, he had moved into rental accommodation but died before his house was ready.

“Rai came from an illustrious family of freedom fighters,” journalist LS Herdenia said, paying tribute to the writer.

(To receive our electronic paper daily on WhatsApp, please click here. We allow sharing of the PDF document on WhatsApp and other social media platforms.)

Posted on: Monday, September 13, 2021, 10:41 p.m. IST


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Cariboo scenes inspire painter – 100 Mile House Free Press

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Cameron Bird had to make the difficult choice of upscaling or painting it.

The Lac La Hache artist chose the latter, but his former career as a pack horse guide at Chilcotin Holidays Guest Ranch is a great source of inspiration for his works of art.

“Working up there is one of the biggest inspirations for what I do. I paint a lot of mountain and high mountain scenes so as you ride your horse you sit there slowly going through the environment so I was able to study everything, ”Bird said. “It gave me the confidence to paint. Just like a writer. They say “write down what you know” and I have learned over the years to paint what I know. “

Bird, 49, grew up in the Lower Mainland, but had developed a love for the ancient history of Cariboo ranching and horses. After learning to shoe a horse, he decided to work with them. He took a guide course at Chilcotin before finding a job at Chilcotin Holidays Guest Ranch. It was there that he met his wife Amanda.

As a pack horse guide, Bird said he liked the physicality of the guiding and the wide range of jobs, which included hauling logs, taking people on pack trips, and observing. big game. The demanding remote work, however, made it difficult to paint and deliver his work to galleries. Eventually, he chose to hang up his saddle to pick up his brush full time.

“I realized that in order to really do it full time, I just had to take the leap. There wasn’t really a ‘right time’ so I did and have been painting full time since 2000, ”Bird said.

Becoming a professional was something Bird dreamed of since he was a child, following in his father’s artistic footsteps. He started selling his detailed realistic watercolors in high school in 1989.

That started to change when he met his mentor, Kevin C. Smith, with whom he studied for a decade. Smith encouraged Bird to start using oil paints and develop his own unique style, which has evolved a lot over the past 30 years.

“These days I don’t even really think of a pretty picture, I think of powerful colors and interlocking shapes,” Bird said. “I think it’s a natural evolution just to paint everyday.”

To create a piece, Bird scours her sketchbooks for inspiration. He has several in his studio with detailed notes on the setting and location of the sketches. From there, he does a study on a wooden board where he captures the basic energy and colors of the final product.

Once the study was completed, using custom canvases made in Kelowna, Bird began painting his impressionistic depictions of the landscapes and landmarks of Cariboo. He switched to this almost abstract style to better represent the power of the images he sees in his mind.

“My style, one brushstroke can say more than 50 brushstrokes. I love the power in my paintings and a lot of people love the stronger paints on their walls and the more vivid colors, ”said Bird. “Today I have the chance to push him.”

Bird uses a single brush for each painting and uses sign painting skills learned at the British Columbia Institute of Technology. Learning to hold a brush gently and load it correctly has been the key to its success.

His large paintings can go up to $ 10,000 and are sold in galleries from Banff to Quebec. On the business side, he credits Amanda’s support and organizational skills to keeping what he does profitable.

Despite the fact that they could live anywhere, Bird said they chose to move to Lac La Hache to raise their family. He loves the “dry country” of the Cariboo and continues to draw inspiration from its landscapes. He typically produces 120 paintings a year and estimates that he made 5,000 in his lifetime. Although being a professional artist is risky, he says it’s a lifestyle he enjoys living.

” I do not get enough. When we go on vacation, if I want to relax, I usually have to go to places that I wouldn’t paint. Mexico, New Zealand or London, I can just relax, I was not inspired to paint. When I’m in Jasper, however, I’m like ‘oh this is a painting, this is a painting’. I am inspired all the time.


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A young painter from Bogura dedicates a unique art book to Bangabandhu

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Photo: Courtesy

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Photo: Courtesy

The young painter Tariqul Islam portrays his deep respect and admiration for the Father of the Nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, through his works of art.

Since childhood, he loved to draw pictures of Bangabandhu and write about it, with information from various books and internet sources. Recently, he made a book of paintings which testifies to his love for Bangabandhu.

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After three months of effort, he created a 410-page, one-inch-long book of 250 paintings, focusing on childhood, adolescence and the political life of Bangabandhu.

There are 35 pencil drawings and 215 watercolors in the book, which also contains pencil sketches of the four national rulers, seven Birshreshthas, glimpses of the linguistic movement, the historic Bangabadhu speech of March 7, the imprisoned life of Bangabandhu, the Bangladesh Liberation War and our celebration of the victory and brutal massacre of Bangabandhu and his family on August 15th.

Tariqul Islam during labor.

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Tariqul Islam during labor.

Besides the paintings, the book also describes the life of Bangabandhu from 1920 to August 15, 1975, in chronological order. Work is underway to add 90 more pages. There will be 90 more watercolors of Bangabandhu and members of his family.

Originally from the Berer Bari village of the upazila Dhunat of Bogura, Tariqul studied at the Bogra Art College.

He took his first painting lessons from his older brother Tajmilur Rahman, who has a store called “Taj Art” in Bagbari, Gabtoli.

There have been many exhibitions of paintings by Tariqul so far. His works have won numerous awards. In 2019, an exhibition of paintings was held at the Shilpakala Academy in Dhaka, which was attended by artists from 17 different countries. A number of his paintings were exhibited at the event. Apart from this, Tariqul’s paintings have also been exhibited at the Dhanmondi Art Gallery. He attended the Bangabandhu Art Camp in Mymensingh last year. He has also participated in exhibitions in Kathmandu, Myanmar and India.

“On the occasion of the centenary of Bangabandhu’s birth, I wanted to create a record in the Guinness Book of Records by drawing a living 150-foot-long portrait of him. But it would have taken a lakh taka to draw the painting. on canvas, and to exhibit it. I turned to a lot to fundraise, but no one cooperated with me. Although it disappointed me, I did not give up, “he said. added.

Ummey Habiba, acting director of Bogra Art College, said Tariqul’s efforts were undoubtedly laudable.


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Cariboo scenes inspire painter – BC Local News

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Cameron Bird had to make the difficult choice of upscaling or painting it.

The Lac La Hache artist chose the latter, but his former career as a pack horse guide at Chilcotin Holidays Guest Ranch is a great source of inspiration for his works of art.

“Working up there is one of the biggest inspirations for what I do. I paint a lot of mountain and high mountain scenes so as you ride your horse you sit there slowly going through the environment so I got to study everything, ”Bird said. “It gave me the confidence to paint. Just like a writer. They say “write down what you know” and I have learned over the years to paint what I know. “

Bird, 49, grew up in the Lower Mainland, but had developed a love for the ancient history of Cariboo ranching and horses. After learning to shoe a horse, he decided to work with them. He took a guide course at Chilcotin before finding a job at Chilcotin Holidays Guest Ranch. It was there that he met his wife Amanda.

As a pack horse guide, Bird said he liked the physicality of the guiding and the wide range of jobs, which included hauling logs, taking people on pack trips, and observing. big game. The demanding remote work, however, made it difficult to paint and deliver his work to galleries. Eventually, he chose to hang up his saddle to pick up his brush full time.

“I realized that in order to really do it full time, I just had to take the leap. There wasn’t really a ‘right time’ so I did and have been painting full time since 2000, ”Bird said.

Becoming a professional was something Bird dreamed of since he was a child, following in his father’s artistic footsteps. He started selling his detailed realistic watercolors in high school in 1989.

That started to change when he met his mentor, Kevin C. Smith, with whom he studied for a decade. Smith encouraged Bird to start using oil paints and develop his own unique style, which has evolved a lot over the past 30 years.

“These days I don’t even really think of a pretty picture, I think of powerful colors and interlocking shapes,” Bird said. “I think it’s a natural evolution just to paint everyday.”

To create a piece, Bird scours her sketchbooks for inspiration. He has several in his studio with detailed notes on the setting and location of the sketches. From there, he does a study on a wooden board where he captures the basic energy and colors of the final product.

Once the study was completed, using custom canvases made in Kelowna, Bird began painting his impressionistic depictions of the landscapes and landmarks of Cariboo. He switched to this almost abstract style to better represent the power of the images he sees in his mind.

“My style, one brushstroke can say more than 50 brushstrokes. I love the power in my paintings and a lot of people love the stronger paints on their walls and the more vivid colors, ”said Bird. “Today I have the chance to push him.”

Bird uses a single brush for each painting and uses sign painting skills learned at the British Columbia Institute of Technology. Learning to hold a brush gently and load it correctly has been the key to its success.

His large paintings can go up to $ 10,000 and are sold in galleries from Banff to Quebec. On the business side, he credits Amanda’s support and organizational skills to keeping what he does profitable.

Despite the fact that they could live anywhere, Bird said they chose to move to Lac La Hache to raise their family. He loves the “dry country” of the Cariboo and continues to draw inspiration from its landscapes. He typically produces 120 paintings a year and estimates that he made 5,000 in his lifetime. Although being a professional artist is risky, he says it’s a lifestyle he enjoys living.

” I do not get enough. When we go on vacation, if I want to relax, I usually have to go to places that I wouldn’t paint. Mexico, New Zealand or London, I can just relax, I was not inspired to paint. When I’m in Jasper, however, I’m like ‘oh this is a painting, this is a painting’. I am inspired all the time.


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An untitled painting of a mountain by Cameron Bird. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

While he prefers landscapes, Cameron Bird sometimes likes to paint large game such as moose. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

A Cariboo log cabin in the winter by Cameron Bird. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

Cameron Bird works on a study painting before working on a large canvas for the finished work. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

Cameron Bird is leafing through one of his many sketchbooks. Most of Bird’s paintings start out as sketches and notes in these books before being turned into works of art. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

A British Columbia Vineyard by Cameron Bird. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

Although he specializes in painting mountains, Cameron Bird will occasionally paint West Coast inspired images like this canoe. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)

A painting of a bear by Cameron Bird. (Photo by Patrick Davies – 100 Mile Free Press)



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The 1950s Pinay painter is the star of today’s auctions

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His “Tinapa sellers” sold for 84 million euros in February, by far the biggest source of money in this big auction which opened the year. Four months later, his “Women with Baskets, Fish and Crab” fetched 52.6 million pesos at the spectacular mid-year auction, overtaking a Vicente Manansala as well as a Fernando Amorsolo who, as “Women with Baskets” depict scenes from the Filipino market.

The “egg sellers” of Anita Magsaysay Ho

While another painting by Anita Magsaysay-Ho takes center stage this weekend at the Leon Gallery’s September auction, an image titled “Egg Vendors” made in the tempera medium at the artist’s favorite egg, with a starting price of 7 million pesos, the question arises: How do this woman’s paintings attract collectors today? Or in other words, how did a 1950s artist become the sensation of the 2021 auction?

For Jaime Ponce de Leon, director of the Leon Gallery, the lady’s accomplishments, her stature in Manila society and the limited works she left behind are the reasons why an Anita remains highly desirable almost a decade later. his passing and more than half a century after the defining years of his career.

“She didn’t paint much and only painted for her close circle of friends,” says Ponce de Leon, the force behind the country’s leading auction house. “Thus, his pieces have above all a cachet, because his circle belongs to the highest echelons of Manila. The provenances are all genealogical and this is already an absolute bonus in auction jargon.

Anita Magsaysay Ho's
“Women with Baskets, Fish and Crab” by Anita Magsaysay Ho

When we think of Anita Magsaysay-Ho, we think of her women wearing bandanas in rural areas happily doing everyday things – images inspired by the summer vacation she spent in her native Zambales. She has created iconic images of women making even the most ordinary tasks extraordinary. Her success puts her in the spotlight and equals the troupe of neo-realists and modernists, almost all of them male except Nena Saguil and Lyd Arguilla.

Daughter of an engineer named Ambrosio Magsaysay, brother of Philippine President Ramon Magsaysay, Anita studied at the UP School of Fine Arts where she was trained by Fernando Amorsolo and Fabian Dela Rosa, pillars of Filipino art. Later, while enrolled in the UP School of Design, Anita would have the privilege of having Victorio Edades as one of her instructors.

Having the means to continue her studies abroad, the young artist left for the United States in the 1930s and took oil painting classes at Cranbrook Academy in Michigan, and drawing classes at the Art Student’s League of New York.

She was the first woman to win the grand prize of the prestigious Art Association of the Philippines (AAP) competition in 1952. Looking at auctions for her paintings these days, it’s been compared to watching a Wimbledon match with its fast, non-stop volleys, fighting over the artist’s work isn’t exactly a recent occurrence. His winning AAP ’52 entry, “The Cooks,” quickly sparked a high-profile contest to own it as influential newspaper columnists and wealthy collectors vied for this treasure, even resorting to grappling in the press for it. privilege.

Robert Ho and Anita Magsaysay-Ho
Anita with her husband Robert Ho.

A few years later, Anita would be even more firmly established. In May 1956, The Sunday Times Magazine – one of the most widely read newspapers in the Philippines with a circulation of 1 million copies per day – called her “The Greatest Woman Painter in the Country Today” in an article titled “Mrs. The women of Ho.

Anita’s market paintings would then be justifiably famous. The Sunday Times continued to speak eloquently of the artist, citing famous American writer Agnes Newton Keith, in her book “Barefoot in the Palace” on post-war Filipino life, saying: “(His) market women are thin, pointed, skinny, talkative. They are both cunning and generous, both skeptical and believing. (Anita is) sorry for them because she knows she doesn’t have to be. her gods were wealth and sweetness of life, she would paint pathos and weakness on those faces. Instead, (she) put mysticism, strength, love and zest for life.

Anita married Robert Ho in 1947 and gave birth “in quick succession” to five children, one of whom would become the figure of the company and the fierce businesswoman Doris Ho, now President and CEO of the Magsaysay Group of Companies. The Hos “have lived in over 30 homes in more than six countries over a period of 50 years,” a story tells of Tatler in the Philippines. They would settle in Hong Kong for a while where the couple would host dinner parties for select friends from Manila, as longtime boyfriend Charito Panganiban-Melchor and daughter Doris friend Monique Villonco recall.

Those who talk about the allure of an Anita painting spring from her aura of serenity, her sense of humor and the glow that seems to emanate from her women who happily indulge in the day’s toil. “I think it’s so beautiful because it has a magical side to it,” says chef Margarita Forés of ‘Egg Vendors’. “I love the warmth of it.”

Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan
Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan where Anita studied before the war. Image courtesy of Galerie Léon

Having been painted during the country’s post-war years, Anita’s works also embody this spirit of timeless hope, to move forward no matter the odds. And maybe that’s why his paintings continue to resonate. Was there ever a time when this country needed more hope?

With the obvious clamor for his works, one must ask the question: are there still Anitas waiting for their moment at auction? “Definitely,” says Jaime Ponce de Leon. “There are still some in Anita’s small circle of friends. We should see a small appearance at auction with the dissolution of the large estates. But for egg distempers, “egg sellers” might be among the last to hit the market. They are extremely few. ”

[Photos courtesy of Leon Gallery]


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Deathbed of a writer Portrait of Francis Bacon

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In an email exchange, Murphy described the development of the stage production as a collaborative effort. “Max and Enda had a particularly strong understanding, which guided Enda’s adaptation of the book,” he said. “And Max was extremely generous and invaluable with his work.”

The adaptation retained much of Porter’s signature prose style, which Murphy said was well suited to the stage. “Words are absolutely beautiful to say,” he said. “Like all good writing, the more you say them, the more they reveal.”

Porter’s second outing, “Lanny,” shares a lot with Porter’s debut. Both novels are about loss, told through multiple perspectives of a single family, and feature an ageless and omnipotent observant presence. This time, instead of a crow, we are introduced to Dead Papa Toothwort, a mythical creature of the woods who hides in the shadows, watching over the drama.

Like the jerky rhythm of the Raven-starring chapters, Dead Papa Toothwort’s voice is also frenzied, with its narration interrupted by wayward digressions. These interruptions are expressed by an irregular composition, with words that crisscross and meander on the page.

These chaotic sections echo the content of Porter’s notebooks, where ideas for his novels are formed. Each book is filled with layouts of scribbled pieces, scribbled characters, scribbled phrases, and random blocks of text. While developing “The Death of Francis Bacon,” he said, he sketched in his notebooks while studying reproductions of the painter’s work.

“For three months,” he said, “I did nothing other than look at pictures of Bacon every day.”


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MAG welcomes Albertan painter David More to celebrate his work

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MAG Executive Director Lorna Johnson says MAG staff are so proud of this publication.

“It was a pleasure working with Dave, Mary-Beth and the University of Calgary Press to realize our vision for a publication that would reflect Dave’s work and celebrate his generous donation of works to MAG. It is an important step in the documentation of the art history of central Alberta.

More himself says being the subject of a book is truly a privilege, and says it allows him to share the vision he and his wife Yvette have on a much larger world.

“Equally important, this book brings the Red Deer Museum + Art Gallery to the international stage where it deserves to be. Lorna Johnson and her formidable team raised the profile of Red Deer MAG to unimaginable heights during her tenure. Working with charming author Mary-Beth Laviolette and the eminent University of Calgary Press over the past year has provided us with a most memorable journey.

David More and his wife Yvette Brideau donated 200 of his paintings and drawings to the Red Deer Museum + Art Gallery in 2019. In the same year, to recognize Dave’s generous donation, MAG organized a retrospective exhibition of his work that was organized and organized by independent curator Mary-Beth Laviolette. As an extension of her research and to celebrate Dave’s artistic achievements, Mary-Beth also wrote The largest garden. Published by University of Calgary Press, The largest garden beautifully examines the myriad subjects that have captured Dave’s attention and imagination over the years, and reflects the evolution of his artistic practice.

About David Plus

David More is one of the outstanding painters of Western Canada. Based in the rural hamlet of Benalto, near Red Deer, Alta., He is part of a generation of landscape artists who emerged in the 1970s to bring beauty out of the ordinary and challenge the expected with action. daring creation.

Throughout his career, More returned to the garden as a deeply functional but ritualistic space of human effort. The garden is a place of shelter and sanctuary, of color and fragrance, of order and of wild nature. The garden is a private space, carefully maintained and planted, observed in the open air or through the living room window. The garden is a public space, a park where people come together to let their nature flourish. The garden is the world, the nature that sustains and surrounds us, the environment in which we all live, and all have a responsibility to cultivate and care for.

About the Author

Mary-Beth Laviolette is a freelance curator and writer with 40 years of visual arts practice. She is the author of A Chronicle of Albertan Art and A delicate art: artists, wild flowers and plants native to the West. She has curated exhibitions for the Art Gallery of Alberta, the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, the Whyte Museum, and more. Mary-Beth is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Alberta Centennial Medal and Artist in the Spotlight.


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